Thursday, February 11, 2010

Who Decides Patients' Rights?

Barbara Coombs Lee of Compassion & Choices has a new post up at DailyKos. Here's a clip:

Here’s another scenario:

The phone rings. It’s the assisted living facility’s care supervisor; my father collapsed just after dinner. "The EMTs are taking him to Mercy Hospital." An hour later I am driving down Baltimore Pike into southwest Philadelphia.

I find my father in the ICU. Hooked up to all the tubes and equipment he looks so much older than a week ago. Over the next day and a half of tests and waiting – learning it’s a stroke – he doesn’t wake or stir. I’m sitting with him mid-morning when the neurologist arrives. He goes over results and treatments they’ve tried. "It’s unlikely that your father will regain consciousness, and if he did, very unlikely that he would return to normal mental function. We need to think about next steps."

My father designated me his health care proxy for a moment like this. His advance directive is clear, and he’s been blunt in conversation. "Look, I’m eighty-three years old, and I’ve had all the breaks. If something happens, I don’t want to sit in a chair and drool for years."

I make an appointment to see the social worker in her office, where we’re joined by a priest. I tell them we’re ready to remove life support. She turns to the priest. He says, "Mercy Hospital is committed to honoring advance directives for health care decisions as long as they do not contradict Catholic principles," The priest has a copy of my father’s advance directive and reads from it. "If I am ever consistently and permanently unable to communicate, swallow food and water safely, care for myself and recognize my family and other people, and it is very unlikely that my condition will substantially improve, I would want to die rather than have life-sustaining treatments."

The priest looks up. "Your father’s living will suggests that in his unconscious state his life is no longer worth living. Under these conditions, removing life support would be an act of euthanasia by omission."

Catholic bioethical thought has evolved over centuries. The ERDs that govern care in Catholic hospitals and nursing homes are extremely nuanced. Your directions about life support may or may not be honored in a Catholic institution. Your concern about the burdens of medical interventions might justify forgoing life-sustaining medical treatment. But a wish to be allowed to die under certain circumstances might not.

Have you talked with your family about end-of-life options? Good.

Is an advance directive in place? Excellent!

Will that directive be honored in a Catholic health care facility? We cannot know for sure.

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1 Comments:

Anonymous personal care products58 said...

Its one of the nice post which I really like a lot.Thanks for another interesting piece of writing.I have been searching for this type of posts.Keep up the good works.

February 12, 2010 at 4:59 AM  

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